Category Archives: Uncategorized

The Buck . . . . . . is back.

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The Buck Inn re-opened for the Bank Holiday week-end after a year and a half. This news was sent to us by Lynn and Stephen, from West Wind Tea Rooms and Walker’s Lodge in their popular Newsletter. The Buck has been taken on by Jeremy and Joanne, both of whom have parents living in the village. We hope that walkers take advantage and give this important village business their support.

Lynn goes on to inform us that this brings to five, the number of places to get an evening meal within 2 miles of Buckden. As well as the all-new Buck, there is the George Inn at Hubberholme, the White Lion Inn at Cray and the Fox and Hounds and Cellia’s Pizzeria at Starbottom.

The Dales Way Association welcome its return and hope that it prospers, along with the other accommodations listed on our Home Page. Buckden is an important staging post on the Dales Way journey.

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Nothing lasts forever . . . . . . . . . .

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Over the years, the Dales Way Association has been asked for advice by walkers as to how they can place, maybe a seat or sapling etc together with a suitable plaque along the Dales Way to mark a special event. A few have been successful, as observant walkers may have discovered, but in general, the Authorities and Councils along the way are not in favour. However, those who wish to do any of the above, could find a solution with the Lake District National Park Authority.

Last year the DWA produced a video in their Dales Way. By gate, stile and fingerpost series, Staveley to Bowness. This video can be viewed, along with the others, on our Home page. All current fingerposts are in the video. Following on from this we asked the Authority if some of the fingerposts could be replaced. They agreed, and we offered to contribute. They in turn said that they had in place a procedure whereby items could be sponsored and an appropriate plaque put in place.

5 replacement Dales Way fingerposts have now been added to their web site available for adoption. The fingerposts will have Dales Way on the blade, some with a destination  and mileage. To view, follow instructions below.

Go to http://www.lakedistrict.gov.uk  and scroll down to the bottom of the home page, click on to make a donation. Scroll down to Pick an area to sponsor then click the tab Central and South Eastern area.

The Dales Way fingerposts are the last additions and are in a West to East sequence.

Why do landowners always put gates in the middle of a puddle?

DWay Gate Tennis ClubThis photo was taken on Tuesday 26th March by committee member Tony Grogan. This is the third gate after leaving the Ilkley Tennis Club at the start of the Dales Way. Walkers were avoiding this altogether and walking on the other side of the fence in the farmers field leading to the farmers gate. Apparently this is not an isolated case. The Area Right of Way Officer of Bradford Metropolitan District Council has been informed. They, in turn, have contacted their Countryside Team to see if the drainage can be improved.

“If at first you don’t succeed . . . . . . . . . .”

 

Following a complaint from three senior walkers in October 2014 about difficult stiles between Bolton Bridge and Addingham, I contacted Tim Brooks, Area Right of Way Officer, Bradford Metropolitan District Council, on behalf of the Dales Way Association, as to how this section of the Dales Way could be improved for Dales Way and local walkers. For reference, a video was produced of all the stiles from Olicana Caravan park to Bolton Road. This was put up on YouTube under the title: Ilkley to B Ab. Stiles. (Dales Way – of  limited interest)

Particular reference was made about the very difficult high stile near the steps leading up to Bolton Road. (Right hand stile above.) Resistance to any change by the landowner prevented any progress with no legal way to change the situation.

However, Tim Brooks has now informed us that they have permission to replace two of the stiles on this section. The ladder stile will be replaced with a pedestrian gate and the wooden stile replaced with a kissing gate. This latter improvement is most welcome, as the height of the step-over makes it very difficult for all but the most agile walker to cross. This work will be done at some point in the summer.

The Dales Way Association, on behalf of all Dales Way and local walkers, wish to thank Bradford Metropolitan District Council Officers for their tenacity in following up and solving walkers complaints.

 

Cumbria County Council continue to improve the Dales Way with a new gate and footbridge.

Gate AA difficult, very old stile, especially in wet weather, for small children and those less agile than they used to be, has been replaced with a new gate. This is on the footpath between Burton House and the Oak Bank Road. Sad but necessary, I am afraid.

20180223_125524Further along the trail, a damaged plank bridge has been replaced with a handsome new fit for purpose crossing.

 

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The bridge has been replaced under CCC Flood Recovery Program funded by the Rural Payments Agency’s Cumbria Countryside Access Fund, which is being used to repair the damage on flagship routes within the county. Photos by CCC

 

 

Include the Watershed Alternative in your walking plans.

P1010900Views into Dentdale from the slopes of Great Knoughtberry Fell, which is part of the alternative footpath which avoids the road walking from Cold Kell Gate to Lea Yeat.

A new video in our gate, stile and fingerpost series has been posted on YouTube and can also be viewed on our Home Page under the side heading Videos.

The title is The Dales Way footpath in Dentdale. By gate, stile and fingerpost. The video includes a map plus distances and times. Good weather is essential if you wish to enjoy the finest views along the Dales Way. On the home page a description of the walk is available to download in a PDF format.

Arten Gill Viaduct below in the valley.

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Another bridge repaired.

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I would guess that Dales Way walkers had never heard of Fishemans Bridge, despite passing it, 150 metres West of Hole House, on the Lincoln’s Inn Bridge to Crook of Lune Bridge stretch of the footpath. It came to prominence when it was swept away in the December 2016 storms, as the river Lune rose to record levels. The footbridge near

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Thwaite, is the only means to cross the river between the Lincoln’s Inn and Crook of Lune bridges, a distance of 3 miles. The project, which was started last year, was not without its drama and difficulty, battling with wet weather most of the time. Heavy rain in November swelled the river so much that the scaffolding supporting the bridge was swept away, buckling the almost finished structure. The problem was overcome with the help of a crane and some spare parts, courtesy of Cumbria County Council. The finished bridge is a beautiful structure, built to last. An official opening of the bridge is being planned for early 2018. Information supplied by Steve Hastie. Area Manager (Western Dales.) Photographs supplied by Cumbria County Council.

The Dales Way Association donated £500 to the project.